Programmatic promiscuity is a term I’ve been using in my thesis to discuss the increasingly hybrid nature of new condominium construction. The idea of urbanity as a spatial construction, as an interior element, is now fundamental in the city of high-rise living. The increasingly dense city, conjuring Koolhaas’ description of the “culture of congestion,” has produced a complexity of myriad programmes that increasingly must share built environments, the scarcity of downtown real estate necessitating functional promiscuity. Past the modernist notions of master planning a horizontal distribution and segregation of use-zones, urbanity now must also operate in section. Dwelling units stacked on top of hotels stacked on top of offices stacked on top of shops stacked on top of parking lots…
In Delirious New York, Rem Koolhaas explored the excitement surrounding the first high-rises in Manhattan, marvelling at the first city that became so congested it had nowhere to expand but straight up. In the high-rise, Koolhaas identified the multiplication of New York’s grid, each plot reproducing itself over and over again. He identifies the 1909 theorem as the ultimate urban Utopic vision, a single lot containing multiple realities; any floor could contain anything. He called this the “culture of congestion.”
Joseph Fenton was the one of the first to catalogue this new building form in his Pamphlet Architecture 11 from 1985, “Hybrid Buildings”.
Atelier Bow Wow, similarly catalogued unique Tokyo-based hybrid building forms in “Made in Tokyo”. These were characterized by odd combinations of programme assembled not because there was inherent advantages to pairing the particular programme but out of a lack of space. “…They appear out of greedy utilitarianism..”
Programmatic Promiscuity is a new term meant to relate to these previously discussed forms, but conveys a sleazier, exploitative meaning referring to condo developers giddiness to take advantage of other programmes to turn profit. In Toronto we have seen condo towers used to facilitate the construction of cinemas, performance centers, parks, pedestrian bridges, hotels, and even public schools and public libraries. What does it say about our city when private developers are required to ensure the construction of our schools?

Programmatic promiscuity is a term I’ve been using in my thesis to discuss the increasingly hybrid nature of new condominium construction. The idea of urbanity as a spatial construction, as an interior element, is now fundamental in the city of high-rise living. The increasingly dense city, conjuring Koolhaas’ description of the “culture of congestion,” has produced a complexity of myriad programmes that increasingly must share built environments, the scarcity of downtown real estate necessitating functional promiscuity. Past the modernist notions of master planning a horizontal distribution and segregation of use-zones, urbanity now must also operate in section. Dwelling units stacked on top of hotels stacked on top of offices stacked on top of shops stacked on top of parking lots…

In Delirious New York, Rem Koolhaas explored the excitement surrounding the first high-rises in Manhattan, marvelling at the first city that became so congested it had nowhere to expand but straight up. In the high-rise, Koolhaas identified the multiplication of New York’s grid, each plot reproducing itself over and over again. He identifies the 1909 theorem as the ultimate urban Utopic vision, a single lot containing multiple realities; any floor could contain anything. He called this the “culture of congestion.”

Joseph Fenton was the one of the first to catalogue this new building form in his Pamphlet Architecture 11 from 1985, “Hybrid Buildings”.

Atelier Bow Wow, similarly catalogued unique Tokyo-based hybrid building forms in “Made in Tokyo”. These were characterized by odd combinations of programme assembled not because there was inherent advantages to pairing the particular programme but out of a lack of space. “…They appear out of greedy utilitarianism..”

Programmatic Promiscuity is a new term meant to relate to these previously discussed forms, but conveys a sleazier, exploitative meaning referring to condo developers giddiness to take advantage of other programmes to turn profit. In Toronto we have seen condo towers used to facilitate the construction of cinemas, performance centers, parks, pedestrian bridges, hotels, and even public schools and public libraries. What does it say about our city when private developers are required to ensure the construction of our schools?

@3 years ago with 11 notes
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#rem koolhaas #delirious new york #Atelier Bow Wow #Made in Tokyo #Joseph Fenton #Hybrid Architecture #Programmatic Promiscuity #diagram 
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